General Dentistry

Sugar Addiction and Your Teeth

By November 28, 2016 No Comments

Sugar Addiction and Your Teeth

Sugar is one of the most disastrous substances that can come into contact with your teeth. Although a slice of cake once in a while is not going to damage too much, some people suffer from a genuine addiction to sweet snacks. For the well-being of your dental health, it is vital to cut back on sugary treats when you can so that you can have healthy oral structures.

Can You Really Get Addicted?

When most people hear the term “addiction,” their first thoughts turn toward drugs and alcohol. However, people can get addicted to almost anything, and that includes sugary treats such as candy and soda. The substance can truly alter your brain chemistry to the point where you actively seek out sugar on a daily basis and have trouble functioning without it. If you are concerned you are eating too much junk food, then you need to take proper steps to wean yourself off the substance.

How Does It Affect Oral Health?

A study performed by Public Health England showed that if the general population reduced its intake of sugary snacks by just five percent, then six million teeth could be saved. The reason is that this material aids in the development of cavities. Bacteria eat the sugary residue left behind on your oral structures, allowing them to grow exponentially.

How Can Intake Be Reduced?

It might seem difficult to lower the amount of sugary substances you eat because the substance seems to be added to virtually everything. Fortunately, there are some tips.

• Eat more “real” food, so you feel less hungry.
• Eat fruits as an alternative to sweets.
• Drink plenty of water throughout the day.
• Read nutrition labels, so you know exactly what you are eating.

Cavities can quickly escalate into far more dangerous oral health problems, so it is best to avoid them at all costs. Make eating less sugar a priority, and your teeth will definitely thank you.

Contact The Center City Dentist Today For Your Dental Cleaning

For more information and to develop a treatment plan for you, consult with us today! Call us now (215) 567-2666.